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Spring

Spring Splendor Awaits You in Morris County Historic Treasure: New Jersey has been home to many wealthy entrepreneurs who used their money to build stately homes. Nestled aw…Read More

Spring Splendor Awaits You in Morris County

Historic Treasure:

New Jersey has been home to many wealthy entrepreneurs who used their money to build stately homes. Nestled away in forested corners of the countryside, they aren’t always open to the public.

On alternate years Mansion in May affords an opportunity to experience both turn-of-the-century and modern artistic sensibilities at one of these homes. In 2014 Blairsden, a Louis XIV chateau-style mansion in Peapack-Gladstone, showcased for 52 designers who will make over its rooms in their own styles. It’s one of many ways to experience springtime in the Morris County area as people, plants and animals emerge from the frigid, snowy winter.

Mansion in May, which began in 1974, raises money for the Morristown Medical Center. Proceeds this year will go toward an expanded pediatric intensive care unit and a new autism center within the Goryeb Children’s Hospital building.

The mansion was open from May 1 to 31 and was the biggest ever done by Mansion in May. The imposing estate covers 62,000 feet and will feature 52 new design spaces as well as the work of four landscape artists. The designers “come from all areas of New York, Pennsylvania, northern and central New Jersey,” said Kathy Hobbs, a spokesperson for Mansion in May.

Blairsden was built by C. Ledyard Blair, a New York City financier, sportsman and commodore of the New York Yacht Club, between 1897 and 1903. It sits on a 500-acre estate.

As visitors approached the mansion along its mile-long driveway, they passed busts of the first 12 Roman emperors that line a 300-foot-long reflecting pool. The theme for the landscape artists was an Italian garden featuring ornamentals, sculptures and pots.

Inside the mansion, guests admires the curving limestone double stairway, a sterling silver and bronze chandelier, elaborate plaster moldings and pilasters, paneling of walnut, oak and mahogany, and, of course, the work of the 52 designers.

Stay informed on future Mansion In May events by visiting mansioninmay.org

Flowers power:

Spring is a time to shrug off heavy winter coats, uncurl from in front of the fire and head outdoors. Few places in Morris County unfurl the springtime banner better than Frelinghuysen Arboretum in Morris Township.

Here are cultivated gardens, flowering trees, wild meadows and shady forests. Frelinghuysen Arboretum is open year round, but it is in the spring that the cherry trees, dogwoods, azaleas and redbuds put forth their spectacular displays. Beds of tulips and daffodils dot the grounds.

“The Frelinghuysen is more than just a beautiful garden,” said Leslie Parness of the Friends of the Frelinghuysen Arboretum. “It’s a place in which you can take away lots of information for beautifying your own home.”

To that end, the Arboretum has free monthly tours starting in April on the first Sunday of each month. The 45-minute walks starting at 2 p.m. are led by knowledgeable docents. One of the highlights of the year at Frelinghuysen is the plant sale on May 3-4 where plant advisors will help you choose the best plants for your garden.

As this year is the 350th anniversary of New Jersey, it’s worth taking a look at the Colonial Revival mansion that serves as headquarters for the Morris County Park Commission. It was owned by George Griswold Frelinghuysen. The Frelinghuysen family’s story is woven throughout the state’s long history.

Children aren’t forgotten at the Arboretum. They can join monthly scavenger hunts where they must take pictures of a dozen clues in order to win prizes. Cost is $10 per family.

More information about Frelinghuysen Arboretum can be found can be found at arboretumfriends.org or at the web site of the Morris County Park Commission.

Birds and the Bees:

Spring is just as much for children as it is for adults. And what could capture a child’s fancy better than the creatures that creep and crawl through the Great Swamp?

“We have spring peepers and wood frogs that are going to come out. Even by the end of March we’ll start hearing them singing,” said Jenny Gaus-Myers of the Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center. “Those particular frogs just fill the little vernal pools in the woods. And it can be deafening, the sound of those two little frogs because there’s so many of them.”

Turtles and snakes emerge later in the spring along with butterflies and other insect life.

Programs for children and families at the Education Center number in the “bazillions,” according to Gaus-Myers. They are for toddlers as young as 2 or 3 years old as well as for older children. A night hike on April 11 starting at 7 p.m. and costing $6 per person enables families to explore the nocturnal creatures of the swamp.

The Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center encompasses 45 wild acres and adjoins the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. It is a prime spot for bird watching with 223 species having been recorded in the swamp.

“The ones that people get excited about are the warblers,” Gaus-Meyers said. “They’re the ones that are very tiny but really colorful. They’re singing. They’re not easy to track with your eyes because they’re constantly moving.”

Find out more about the Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center, which is also part of the Morris County Park System, at morrisparks.net.

For more information about planning your visit to Morris County, order your Visitors Guide today.

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Summer

Recent winters in New Jersey have been hard ones; snowstorms piled up one after another and frigid temperatures numbed fingers and toes. That was the reality for the Contin…Read More

Recent winters in New Jersey have been hard ones; snowstorms piled up one after another and frigid temperatures numbed fingers and toes. That was the reality for the Continental Army in the winter of 1779-80, one of the worst the East Coast had ever known. Twenty-four snowstorms and bitter cold made it likely the bedraggled army would dissolve, leaving America without an effective fighting force in the Northeast.

Yet the army survived under the leadership of George Washington and marched out of Jockey Hollow that spring as a more cohesive and disciplined unit, one that would go on to corner and defeat General Cornwallis at Yorktown in the decisive battle of the war.

The Morristown National Historical Park is a focal point for understanding the state’s role in American history. The park consists of several segments, including the Ford Mansion in Morristown where Washington had his headquarters, Jockey Hollow and Fort Nonsense.

During the warm days of summer, it may difficult to imagine a soldier’s life in the terrible winter of 1779-80. But July 4 events will help to suggest the revolutionary fervor that existed in the Morristown area at that time.

They are part of Revolutionary Times, sponsored by the Morris County Tourism Bureau, the Morris County Park Commission, Morristown National Historical Park and designated a Liberty Event by the New Jersey Historical Commission.

Park ranger Tom Winslow will read the Declaration of Independence on the Green in Morristown at 12:30 p.m., a performance he’s been delivering for 23 years.

“I think many of them that have approached me at the event are just glad to have something during the day that helps people appreciate the true significance of Independence Day,” said Winslow, who dons a period costume for the event. “I find that they like to bring their children out so that they can have an appreciation of the history and that Independence Day is more than just picnics.”

Another park ranger, Eric Olsen, warms up the crowd by telling tales of the time, some of which may have had the truth stretched more than a little. He always encourages visitors to be responsive when the Declaration is read, to shout “Huzzah” at appropriate times or to hiss when England is mentioned.

“We wanted people to picture what it must have been like to be there at the first reading,” Winslow said. “It was more than entertainment. They would realize that this was a document that was going to change everything, change their lives.”

Morristown National Historical Park is open year round. Because of budget cutbacks, it is closed some days, so visitors should check nps.gov/morr for operating hours.

The best starting point for a trip to the park is the visitor center at Jockey Hollow. The center shows “Morristown: Where America Survived,” a 30-minute documentary describing the army’s travails during the winter of 1779-80.

The visitor center also has a replica of a completely equipped soldier’s hut as well as rangers to answer questions about the park. Just yards from the center is the Wick House, a restored 18th-century structure built in 1752.

The Washington’s Headquarters Museum in Morristown helps visitors get a sense of the times with galleries on domestic topics and military life. Adjacent to the museum is the Ford Mansion where Washington and his staff had their headquarters. It is open for hourly tours.

New Jersey’s 350th anniversary has not gone unnoticed by the Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey. Beginning July 2 it will be presenting George Bernard Shaw’s play “The Devil’s Disciple,” set in America at the time of the Revolution.

“It’s funny, it’s quite dramatic,” said Bonnie Monte, artistic director for the Shakespeare Theatre, which is on the sylvan campus of Drew University in Madison.

“It tells a very compelling story. It has real-life historical figures in it. It has very unlikely heroes. They’re kind of anti-heroes who both end up doing acts of pure personal sacrifice in the hope that a nation can be formed in the right way.”

The Devil’s Disciple is the only one of Shaw’s plays set in America and was his first to garner a strong box office. Although it debuted in 1897, the play has relevance for the 21st century, according to Monte.

“It is filled with characters that we all recognize in our own families still to this day,” Monte said. “It’s got romance, it’s got all kinds of wonderful things and yet it’s extremely thought provoking.”

The cast will have James Knight as Dick Dudgeon, Paul Niebanck as Anthony Anderson and Elizabeth Anne Davis as Judith Anderson with Paul Mullins directing.

If these Revolutionary events whet your appetite for some atmospheric dining, head for the Black Horse Tavern and Pub in Mendham. At the 1740 renovated farmhouse, dig into its famous spit-roasted prime rib or sample pan seared scallops.

The Washington St. Bistro in Morristown features Colonial-inspired fare such as baked meatloaf or bouillabaisse. If you’re ready to return to the present day, George & Martha’s American Grille, also in Morristown, provides a traditional American menu.

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Chester in the Fall

Spotlight on Chester!The hidden byways, the little surprises, the discovered dining spot are in some ways what make Chester, New Jersey, so beguiling.Sure, Main Street greets …Read More

Spotlight on Chester!

The hidden byways, the little surprises, the discovered dining spot are in some ways what make Chester, New Jersey, so beguiling.

Sure, Main Street greets you with open arms, its unique shops luring you inside to make a charming purchase that will leave a smile on your face the rest of the day. The Streets of Chester offers high-end fashion but, with the stationary store Papyrus, also asserts that writing with ink on paper is still fashionable. Alstede Farms brings visitors close to the earth, allowing them to pick fresh fruit, pet farm animals and get lost in a corn maze.

Take an adventurous turn down a side street and you might stumble on A World of Birds or You’re Not in Kansas Anymore or Sally Lunn’s Tea Room.

Sally Lunn’s is a little piece of English gentility tucked away behind Main Street between Warren and Perry streets. The white embroidered tablecloths, the tea settings displayed on the walls and the solicitous English hostesses set the mood.

The menu is quintessentially English, offering egg salad and cress sandwiches, cottage pie and Cornish pasties. Tea drinkers can chose from 60 different blends, including such startling varieties as licorice and Russian gunpowder.
These attractions, hidden or in plain sight, draw crowds in all seasons, but Chester takes on a special flavor in the autumn.

Visitors to 600-acre Alstede Farms can go on Harvest Moon Hayrides, choose a pumpkin for Halloween or pick apples, raspberries, elderberries and Indian corn.

And of course the corn maze is just the sort of things kids want to explore with the possibility of getting lost adding a little jolt of excitement. Kurt Alstede, who launched Alstede Farms with a little patch of cherry tomatoes in 1982, said this year’s maze theme will be the 200th anniversary of “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

“We find people really have a yearning desire to return to their agricultural roots,” Alstede said, when discussing reasons that draw visitors to his farm.

The farms grows hundreds of fruits and vegetables which families can pick, starting with strawberries at the end of May and running through potatoes, pumpkins, gourds and Indian corn in November.

“That combines with people’s desire to have a fun family activity,” Alstede said. “We offer a family activity that’s relatively inexpensive, that’s outside. There’s no electronic distractions … And the farm is beautiful.”

Children can clamber on the hay bale pyramid or feed friendly goats and donkeys that are always eager for a handout. After all that activity, a trip to the farm store for homemade ice cream is a must.

Once in the store, though, only those with the greatest of will power can emerge without making a purchase. Lined up on shelves to tempt visitors are peach-praline pies, apple caramel cakes, peach fudge, pumpkin butter and raspberry-lime jam to name but a few.

The large number of events and activities at Alstede Farms can be found at alstedefarms.com.

Having completed the farm experience, it’s easy to jump on the shuttle and head to downtown Chester where many of the historic buildings date from the 19th century.

Kathy Barbieri’s Chester Crafts and Collectibles is housed in the Centennial Building, built in 1876. As president of the Historic Chester Business Association (chesternj.org), Barbieri can speak with some authority about why people come to Chester.

“It has the historic downtown shopping and dining,” she said. “We have over 80 stores right here in the historic district. They’re little boutique shops. They have everything. We offer everything down here from antiques, crafts, home décor. We have interior design services, home accessories, furniture.

“Then we also have Streets of Chester which is right over here on (Route) 206. That’s a shopping center. They have a very high end tenant lineup. So again it’s a different type of shopping experience.”



Downtown Chester is best experienced on foot. Along either side of Main Street are little shops with names like Ladyfingers, Winky’s Pet Boutique, Midnight Owl and the Sweet Spot Bake Shoppe. Walk into Chester Crafts and Collectibles and there’s that hand-painted saw blade you didn’t know you wanted but now can’t live without.

On the north side of Main Street is the Publick House, a good place to stop for lunch and soak up some history. It was built in 1810 by Zephaniah Drake to serve as a hotel and tavern, which has been its primary function for more than 200 years. Recently it has made rooms available for overnight stays.

There is no shortage of food in Chester. More than twenty eating establishments offer sustenance ranging from Italian to Thai cuisines to decadent chocolates, all listed in the Historic Chester brochure that is available in all the shops and on the shuttle buses.

Chester is also a town that takes its fairs and festivals seriously. The annual Harvest Celebration is Oct. 11-12 this year and features a pet costume parade. On Oct. 31 is the Halloween Costume Parade as well as trick-or-treating at the Main Street shops. The spring and fall craft shows draw exhibitors from all over the country.

After darting in and out of quaint shops on Main Street, it may be time for some hardcore 21st-century shopping. That’s where Streets of Chester comes in. A shopping center located on Route 206 just south of Main Street, its 25 stores include the Gap, Banana Republic, Ann Taylor, and J. Crew. For a complete listing, go to streetsofchester.com.

Streets of Chester also features a unique eating experience – Truck Stop Gourmet Eatery. Here are gourmet food trucks offering traditional American cuisine, burgers, crepes and sandwiches, and Korean, Mexican and Thai specialties.

The shopping center brings visitors full circle, from the 19th century back to the 21st. Then as the sun goes down it’s time for weary legs to settle down into the car or the shuttle, arms laden with purchases.

On second thought, maybe you should have bought that piece of jewelry or that wooden puzzle box or that scrumptious pie. That makes a perfect excuse to return to Chester another time.Sure, Main Street greets you with open arms, its unique shops luring you inside to make a charming purchase that will leave a smile on your face the rest of the day. The Streets of Chester offers high-end fashion but, with the stationary store Papyrus, also asserts that writing with ink on paper is still fashionable. Alstede Farms brings visitors close to the earth, allowing them to pick fresh fruit, pet farm animals and get lost in a corn maze.

Take an adventurous turn down a side street and you might stumble on A World of Birds or You’re Not in Kansas Anymore or Sally Lunn’s Tea Room.

Sally Lunn’s is a little piece of English gentility tucked away behind Main Street between Warren and Perry streets. The white embroidered tablecloths, the tea settings displayed on the walls and the solicitous English hostesses set the mood.

The menu is quintessentially English, offering egg salad and cress sandwiches, cottage pie and Cornish pasties. Tea drinkers can chose from 60 different blends, including such startling varieties as licorice and Russian gunpowder.
These attractions, hidden or in plain sight, draw crowds in all seasons, but Chester takes on a special flavor in the autumn.

Visitors to 600-acre Alstede Farms can go on Harvest Moon Hayrides, choose a pumpkin for Halloween or pick apples, raspberries, elderberries and Indian corn.

And of course the corn maze is just the sort of things kids want to explore with the possibility of getting lost adding a little jolt of excitement. Kurt Alstede, who launched Alstede Farms with a little patch of cherry tomatoes in 1982, said this year’s maze theme will be the 200th anniversary of “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

“We find people really have a yearning desire to return to their agricultural roots,” Alstede said, when discussing reasons that draw visitors to his farm.

The farms grows hundreds of fruits and vegetables which families can pick, starting with strawberries at the end of May and running through potatoes, pumpkins, gourds and Indian corn in November.

“That combines with people’s desire to have a fun family activity,” Alstede said. “We offer a family activity that’s relatively inexpensive, that’s outside. There’s no electronic distractions … And the farm is beautiful.”

Children can clamber on the hay bale pyramid or feed friendly goats and donkeys that are always eager for a handout. After all that activity, a trip to the farm store for homemade ice cream is a must.

Once in the store, though, only those with the greatest of will power can emerge without making a purchase. Lined up on shelves to tempt visitors are peach-praline pies, apple caramel cakes, peach fudge, pumpkin butter and raspberry-lime jam to name but a few.

The large number of events and activities at Alstede Farms can be found at alstedefarms.com.

Having completed the farm experience, it’s easy to jump on the shuttle and head to downtown Chester where many of the historic buildings date from the 19th century.

Kathy Barbieri’s Chester Crafts and Collectibles is housed in the Centennial Building, built in 1876. As president of the Historic Chester Business Association (chesternj.org), Barbieri can speak with some authority about why people come to Chester.

“It has the historic downtown shopping and dining,” she said. “We have over 80 stores right here in the historic district. They’re little boutique shops. They have everything. We offer everything down here from antiques, crafts, home décor. We have interior design services, home accessories, furniture.

“Then we also have Streets of Chester which is right over here on (Route) 206. That’s a shopping center. They have a very high end tenant lineup. So again it’s a different type of shopping experience.”

Downtown Chester is best experienced on foot. Along either side of Main Street are little shops with names like Ladyfingers, Winky’s Pet Boutique, Midnight Owl and the Sweet Spot Bake Shoppe. Walk into Chester Crafts and Collectibles and there’s that hand-painted saw blade you didn’t know you wanted but now can’t live without.

On the north side of Main Street is the Publick House, a good place to stop for lunch and soak up some history. It was built in 1810 by Zephaniah Drake to serve as a hotel and tavern, which has been its primary function for more than 200 years. Recently it has made rooms available for overnight stays.

There is no shortage of food in Chester. More than twenty eating establishments offer sustenance ranging from Italian to Thai cuisines to decadent chocolates, all listed in the Historic Chester brochure that is available in all the shops and on the shuttle buses.

Chester is also a town that takes its fairs and festivals seriously. The annual Harvest Celebration is Oct. 11-12 this year and features a pet costume parade. On Oct. 31 is the Halloween Costume Parade as well as trick-or-treating at the Main Street shops. The spring and fall craft shows draw exhibitors from all over the country.

After darting in and out of quaint shops on Main Street, it may be time for some hardcore 21st-century shopping. That’s where Streets of Chester comes in. A shopping center located on Route 206 just south of Main Street, its 25 stores include the Gap, Banana Republic, Ann Taylor, and J. Crew. For a complete listing, go to streetsofchester.com.

Streets of Chester also features a unique eating experience – Truck Stop Gourmet Eatery. Here are gourmet food trucks offering traditional American cuisine, burgers, crepes and sandwiches, and Korean, Mexican and Thai specialties.

The shopping center brings visitors full circle, from the 19th century back to the 21st. Then as the sun goes down it’s time for weary legs to settle down into the car or the shuttle, arms laden with purchases.
On second thought, maybe you should have bought that piece of jewelry or that wooden puzzle box or that scrumptious pie. That makes a perfect excuse to return to Chester another time.

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101 Things To Do!

JANUARY Maple Sugaring The maple sugaring season is underway. Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center, Chatham 973-635-6629morrisparks.net Stop In for a Bite Known as the “Be…Read More

JANUARY

Maple Sugaring
The maple sugaring season is underway.
Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center, Chatham
973-635-6629
morrisparks.net
Stop In for a Bite
Known as the “Best deli this side of the Hudson.”
Morristown Deli, Morristown
973-267-3766
morristowndeli.com
The Perfect Getaway
Greek Revival architecture, sweeping staircase, and a beautiful setting.
The Neighbour House, Long Valley
908-876-3519
neighbourhouse.com
Sun or Snow
Personal service when planning your trip to the perfect destination.
Taylored Travel, Morristown
973-455-1987
Take a Stroll on the Green
The Morristown Green is on the National Register of Historic Places and is beautiful in every season.
The Trustees of the Morristown Green
themorristowngreen.org
Learn Something New
Learn about community outreach programs and volunteer opportunities.
Morristown Memorial Hospital
973-971-5000
atlantichealth.org

FEBRUARY

Winter’s Day on the Farm
Take a tractor-pulled wagon ride and help the farmers with their winter chores.
Fosterfields Living Historical Farm, Morris Township
973-326-7645
morrisparks.net
Sweets for your Sweetie!
You'll find shelves of luscious handmade chocolates.
Enjou Chocolat, Morristown
973-993-9090 / 800-305-2853
enjouchocolat.com
Black Maria Film and Video Festival
Short films and videos selected from over 700 entries.
201-200-2043
blackmariafilmfestival.org
Admire Art!
Exhibitions feature the work of emerging and established artists.
Simon Gallery, Morristown
973-538-5456
simongallery.com
Treat Your Honey
Come for dinner and stay the night at the inn where history meets elegance.
The Bernards Inn
908-766-0002/888-766-0002
bernardsinn.com

MARCH

Saint Patrick’s Day Parade
The largest family-oriented St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New Jersey.
South Street, Morristown
paradeday.com
Continue the Party!

Visit a traditional Irish pub, or as everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day, one of our celebrating restaurants.
40 North Restaurants, which include –
Black Horse Tavern & Pub, Mendham
Piattino, Mendham
The Office in Morristown
George and Martha's in Morristown
Charlie Brown, Chatham,
Charlie Brown, Denville,
Dublin Pub, Morristown, 973-538-1999, dublinpubmorristown.com
Grasshopper off the Green, Morristown, 973-285-5150, grasshopperoffthegreen.com
Rod's Steak and Seafood Grill, Convent Station

Artrider Spring Craftshow
Come and experience the display of contemporary work from a
130+ artists and craftspeople from across the country.
artrider.com
Season Opening: Lee’s Marina
Visit Lee’s Marina for boat launching, slip rentals, mooring, and beach storage.
Lee’s Marina, Mt. Arlington
973-398-5199
morrisparks.net
Horseback Riding
Public trail rides in beautiful Loantaka.
Seaton Hackney Stables, Morristown
973-644-3355
seatonhackney.com
Maple Sugar Festival
Enjoy hikes, tapping trees, games, maple syrup snow cones, crafts, syrup taste tests, and more.
Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center, Chatham Township
973-635-6629
morrisparks.net
Shakespeare, Anyone?
New Jersey's only professional theatre company dedicated to Shakespeare's canon and other classic masterworks.
Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey, Madison
973-408-5600
shakespearenj.org
Great Conversations
Bringing the art of conversation to life, enjoy dinner with celebrated hosts.
Arts Council of the Morris Area, Morristown
973-285-5115
morrisarts.org

APRIL

Family Easter Egg Hunt
Meet the bunny, collect some eggs, and have fun.
Chester
ilovechester.com
Tackle the Trail 5K & 1-Mile Dog/Fitness Walk
Participate in a 5K run or 1-mile dog/fitness walk on a course of grass, gravel, and natural trail surfaces.
Central Park of Morris County, Parsippany
973-326-7616
morrisparks.net
Earth Day Celebration
This family-friendly event includes animal shows, interactive displays, crafts, hikes and canoe rides.
Sunrise Lake, Morris Township
973-635-6629
morrisparks.net
Easter Bunny Express
The Easter Bunny makes his annual visit to the Whippany Rail Museum aboard the "Easter Bunny Express”.
Whippany Railway Museum, Whippany
973-887-8177
whippanyrailwaymuseum.net
Hayrides to Bunnyland
Bunnyland is a happy place on the farm in the spring.
Wightman’s Farms, Morristown
973-425-9819
wightmansfarms.com
Masterwork Chorus Concert
Experience famous musical works interpreted by the Masterwork Chorus and Orchestra.
Drew University, Madison
973-455-7008
masterwork.org
Morris Open Skating Competition
Watch outstanding figure skating in Morris County.
Mennen Arena, Morris Township
973-326-7651
morrisparks.net
NJ Daffodil Society Show
A room filled with ribbon-winning daffodils.
Frelinghuysen Arboretum, Morris Township
973-326-7600
morrisparks.net
Downtown Morristown Restaurant Week
Prix fix menus and special promotions at over 45 restaurants
Morristown Partnership, Morristown
973-455-1133
morristown-nj.org

MAY

Born to be Shorn
Watch the hand shearing of sheep and try spinning and weaving.
Cooper Gristmill, Chester Township
908-879-5463
morrisparks.net
Superhero Half Marathon and Relay
Wear your costume to this annual half marathon and relay road race to create a fun and unique event. Sunday after Mother’s Day.Ginty Field, Morris Township862-345-6266
superheroracing.com
Pets on Vacation
The perfect place for your pet to spend a vacation while you enjoy your time away.
The Morris Animal Inn, Morristown
973-539-0377
morrisanimalinn.com
Think Mom
A “make your own”, do-it-yourself, glass art studio specializing in fused, kiln-formed glass.
Glassworks Studio, Morristown
973-656-0800
umakeglass.com
Trout Season!
Visit the largest lake in New Jersey, for fishing, boating, swimming and dining.
Bridge Marina
973-663-1976
Bridgemarinainc.com
Annual Plant Sale
The largest annual plant sale in the area with plant experts on hand to guide your selection.
Frelinghuysen Arboretum, Morris Township
973-326-7603
morrisparks.net
Celebrate the Arts
This free event celebrates local artists and their work.
Arts Council of the Morris Area, Morristown
973-285-5115
morrisarts.org
May Family Day
A family event to celebrate spring.
Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms, Morris Plains
973-540-0311
stickleymuseum.org
Visit Willow Hall
The newest local addition to the National Register of Historic Places is now open.
Willow Hall, Morristown
973-532-9830
passaicriver.org
Shrine Circus
The circus comes to town with juggling clowns and animals.
Mennen Arena, Morris Township
973-326-7651
morrisparks.net
Buy NJ Fresh!
Visit the farmers markets in various communities and enjoy the local bounty in summer and fall.
973-631-5151
morristourism.org

JUNE

Wedding Gifts and More
This shop will meet all your needs for hostess gifts, jewelry and Christmas in July.
The Golden Pineapple, Morristown
973-267-0400
shop14pine.com
Think Dad
Treat dad to a fabulous meal at one of Morris County’s legendary restaurants.
Rod’s Steak and Seafood Grille, Morristown
973-539-6666
rodssteak.com
Civil War Encampment
The 2nd New Jersey Brigade re-enacts the trials and tribulations of camp life during the War Between the States.
Historic Speedwell, Morristown
973.326.6550
morrisparks.net
Giralda Art & Music Festival
Enjoy a picnic dinner and the spectacular sounds of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra at Madison’s Giralda Farms.
Arts Council of the Morris Area
973-285-5115
morrisarts.org
Bonsai Society Show
A show highlighting the Japanese art of growing miniature trees in pots.
Frelinghuysen Arboretum, Morris Township
973-326-7600
morrisparks.net
National Trails Day Celebration
Hikes, talks and activities on the history and natural beauty of the area.
Morris Trails Partnership and Morris County Park Commission.
973-326-7604
morrisparks.net
Summer Family Day
Celebrate the summer with a variety of family activities.
Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms, Morris Plains
973-540-0311
stickleymuseum.org

JULY

Revolutionary Times
American Revolution-related special events including period music and military re-enactments.
973-539-2016
morristourism.org
Public Reading of the Declaration of Independence
Cheer along with rangers and re-enactors as they denounce tyranny and praise liberty on July 4.
Morristown Green
973-539-2016
nps.gov/morr

Family Fun Day and Ice Cream Social
A celebration of summer for the whole family.
Museum of Early Trades & Crafts, Madison
973-377-2982
metc.org
Masterwork Chorus Summer Sings
Come sing with other music lovers!
College of St. Elizabeth, Convent Station
973-455-7008
masterwork.org
Military Timeline Living History
View the changes over time on and off the battlefields.
Cooper Gristmill, Chester
908-879-5463
morrisparks.net
Old Fashioned Fun Day
Family fun at Acorn Hall including tours for children, games on the lawn and dress up.
Acorn Hall, Morristown
973-267-3465
acornhall.org
Food for the Fourth
Enjoy a casual lunch or dinner in a casual patriotic atmosphere.
George and Martha’s American Grille, Morristown
973-267-4700
georgeandmarthas.com
Summer Camp for a Day
Offers a variety of activities for children to do during the month.
Museum of Early Trades & Crafts, Madison
973-377-2982
metc.org

AUGUST

National Night Out
Learn about crime and drug prevention with free food, ice skating, and giveaways.
Mennen Sports Arena, Morris Township
973-326-7651
morrisparks.net
Summer Festival of Baroque Music
A week-long celebration of Baroque music.
Baroque Orchestra of New Jersey, Madison/Morristown
973-366-8922
baroqueorchestra.org
Enjoy the day! Stay the night!
High-style Victorian décor, relaxing porches, nearby recreation and fine dining.
The Whistling Swan Inn, Stanhope
973-347-6369/888-507-2337
whistlingswaninn.com
A Night with a Star or Two
Comedy, dance, music and more in a renovated historic venue. Programs all year.
MPAC, Morristown
973-539-8008
mayoarts.org
Old World Elegance
Dine inside or out for lunch or dinner at this classic French restaurant where you are treated like royalty.
The Grand Café, Morristown
973-540-9444
thegrandcafe.com
Jazz and Blues Festival
A free all day concert on the Morristown Green.
townofmorristown.org

SEPTEMBER

Historical Walking Tours
A series of fall walking tours showcasing many historical aspects of Morris County.
Morris County Tourism Bureau, Morristown
973-631-5151
morristourism.org
Gran Fondo NJ
A mass participation cycling event with a weekend of activities.
Marty’s Reliable Cycle, PACE Racing and Hyatt Morristown
Morristown
973-538-7773
granfondonj.com
Fall Harvest Family Day
This traditional harvest celebration features hayrides and pumpkin painting.
The Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms, Morris Plains
973-540-0311
stickleymuseum.org
Hayrides to the Pumpkin Patch
Visit the farm and enjoy the petting zoo, pick a pumpkin and take a hay ride.
Alstede Farms, Chester
908-879-7189
alstedefarms.com
Meet a Monarch Festival
Learn about these fabulous butterflies and their miraculous journeys.
Pyramid Mountain Natural Historic Area, Boonton
973-334-3130
morrisparks.net
Mount Tabor House Tour
Take a self-guided tour of Victorian cottages set on a hillside.
Mount Tabor Historical Society, Mount Tabor
973-586-1564
mounttabornj.org/HouseTour.htm
1920s Country Fair & Harvest Festival
Join the festivities with horse drawn wagon rides, farm animals and more at an old-fashioned country fair.
Fosterfields Living Historical Farm, Morris Township
973-326-7645
morrisparks.net
Schooley’s Mountain Dog and Sussex Hills Kennel Club Dog Shows
More than 100 animals will be in attendance during two weekends.
Mennen Sports Arena, Morris Township
973-326-7651
morrisparks.net
New Exhibit Opens!
Each September a new exhibit opens in the main gallery.
Macculloch Hall Historical Museum and Gardens, Morristown
973-538-2404
maccullochhall.org

OCTOBER

Historical Walking Tours
A series of fall walking tours showcasing many historical aspects of Morris County.
Morris County Tourism Bureau, Morristown
973-631-5151
morristourism.org
Morristown Festival on the Green
Outdoor street fair with exhibits entertainment and more.
Morristown Partnership, Morristown
973-455-1133
morristown-nj.org
Lenape Day
Learn about the life of New Jersey’s first residents.
Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center, Chatham
973-635-6629
morrisparks.net
Halloween Happenings
Special programs include graveyard tours, the pumpkin illumination, cider and ghost stories.
Morristown
973-631-5151
morristourism.org
Spooky Stuff and More!
Continental American cuisine in a historic setting.
The Grain House Restaurant, Basking Ridge
908-221-1150
oldemillinn.com
“Jersey Lightning”
Learn about the once thriving cider and applejack industry in New Jersey.
Ralston Cider Mill, Mendham
ralstoncidermill.org
Bottle Hill Day
The community comes together for entertainment and family fun.
Downtown Development Corporation, Madison
973-593-8496
ilovemadison.org
A Miller’s Halloween
Come in costume, create corn husk dolls, color pumpkins, play games and enjoy a spooky story.
Cooper Gristmill, Chester
908-879-5463
morrisparks.net
Morristown Craftmarket
One of the nation’s longest running, upscale craft shows.
National Guard Armory, Morristown
973-442-2840
morristowncraftmarket.org
Pumpkin Festival
Come and ride the train in celebration of fall.
Whippany Railway Museum, Whippany
973-887-8177
whippanyrailwaymuseum.net

NOVEMBER

Thanksgiving Harvest Home
Learn how the Fosters and Woods families celebrated in the early 20th century.Fosterfields Living Historical Farm, Morris Township 973-326-7645
morrisparks.net
Squares and Contras for All
Take pleasure in an evening of folk music and square or contra dancing.
The Folk Project/Swingin’ Tern
973-335-9489/ 973-295-6864
folkproject.org
Need a Ride?
The right car for any holiday or occasion.
Enslins Taxi & Limo
973-267-0500
eplustaxi.com
Christmas Festival at the Morristown Green
Festive decorations, Santa and activities from Thanksgiving to Christmas.
Morristown Partnership, Morristown
973-455-1133
morristown-nj.org

DECEMBER

For a History Lover
Visit local gift shops, including the Morris County Tourism Bureau, for historically themed holiday gifts.
973-631-5151
morristourism.org
Gingerbread Wonderland
View the artistry of the gingerbread houses created by groups and individuals.
Frelinghuysen Arboretum, Morris Township
973-326-7603
morrisparks.net
A Country Christmas
Learn how the Fosters came to celebrate Christmas.
Fosterfields Living Historical Farm, Morris Township
973-326-7645
morrisparks.net
Holiday Open House and Trunk Show
Enjoy the season as the Stickley family did.
Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms, Morris Plains
973-540-0311
stickleymuseum.org
Holly Days in Morris County
Special holiday programming including the Walking Tour of Windows decorating contest and heritage sites decorated for Christmas.
Morris County Tourism Bureau, Morristown
973-631-5151
morristourism.org
Cider & Song with The Masterwork Chorus
Enjoy a cup of cheer and listen to the sounds of the season.
Hyatt Morristown
973-455-7008
masterwork.org
Messiah Sing
The traditional holiday performance that will take your breath away.
The Masterwork Chorus, Chatham
973-455-7008
masterwork.org
Santa Claus Special
Enjoy the holidays with a special train ride with jolly ol’ Santa Nick.
Whippany Railway Museum, Whippany
973-887-8177
whippanyrailwaymuseum.net
Winter Solstice Celebration
Take a hike in the brisk air of winter and celebrate the Solstice.
Lewis Morris Park, Morris Township
973-635-6629
morrisparks.net
Snowball Classic
Join in celebrating “Winter Wonderland” with a wonderful ice skating show.
Mennen Arena, Morris Township
973-326-7651
morrisparks.net
First Night Morris
Morristown celebrates New Year’s Eve with entertainment and fireworks.
Morristown
973-455-0708
firstnightmorris.com
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